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mehtapty:

The Maison de Verre (French for House of Glass) was built from 1928 to 1932 in Paris, France. Constructed in the early modern style of architecture, the house’s design emphasized three primary traits: honesty of materials, variable transparency of forms, and juxtaposition of “industrial” materials and fixtures with a more traditional style of home décor. The primary materials used were steel, glass, and glass block. Some of the notable “industrial” elements included rubberized floor tiles, bare steel beams, perforated metal sheet, heavy industrial light fixtures, and mechanical fixtures.

The design was a collaboration among Pierre Chareau (a furniture and interiors designer), Bernard Bijvoet (a Dutch architect working in Paris since 1927) and Louis Dalbet (craftsman metalworker).

1-Elevation

2-Ground Floor Plan

3-First Floor Plan

4-Second Floor Plan

5- Under construction

1-5 via   6- via   7- via

(via thomortiz)

aadnesen:

Can Lis, Mallorca, by Jorn Utzon.

(via arquitecturascorrientes)

finn-wilkie:

John Pawson, St. Moritz Church Renovation, Augsburg, 2013

www.johnpawson.com/

loverofbeauty:

Frederic Edwin Church - Seascape with Icecap in the Distance (detail).

loverofbeauty:

Frederic Edwin Church - Seascape with Icecap in the Distance (detail).

(Source: marieantoinete, via thomortiz)

touof:

Adrian Paci - The Column, 2013

finnishthings:

pirkka chairs,1955, designed by ilmari tapiovaara

finnishthings:

pirkka chairs,1955, designed by ilmari tapiovaara

spaceofstone:

Ilmari Tapiovaara, chair, Lacquered wood, 65 x 68 x 72 cm, 1961, Finland

spaceofstone:

Ilmari Tapiovaara, chair, Lacquered wood, 65 x 68 x 72 cm, 1961, Finland

archatlas:

Arquitecturas/Estancias Bleda y Rosa

"While we were working on their series Cities, we started to photograph spaces related to the urban. This was the start of our special attention to and interest in symbolic and monumental spaces—palaces, noble villas, majestic cities—that manifest a dual nature: they were centres of power and decision-making, but also lived spaces, places of privacy for a variety of personages. This condition also speaks of a dual temporality: that which corresponds to the time of the historic event and that which belongs to personal biographical time. This particular tension in the nature of the spaces in Rooms is caught and accentuated through the fragmentation of architecture, with columns, floors or corners calling up a palpable and intimate space and resisting monumentalization. Our images do not describe these rooms or place us in them, but cause us to experience them and return to them through evocation."

(via arquitecturascorrientes)

elunami:

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe contribution ‘Wabe’ (honeycomb) to the idea competition for the skycraper at the Bahnhof Friedrichstrasse, 1922
Large photograph, supplemented by drawing (140x100 cm)
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2009

elunami:

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe contribution ‘Wabe’ (honeycomb) to the idea competition for the skycraper at the Bahnhof Friedrichstrasse, 1922

Large photograph, supplemented by drawing (140x100 cm)

© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2009

(via grmhrtdesigns)

design-is-fine:

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Neue Nationalgalerie and a large Calder stabile, the Matthaikirche in the background, 1960s

design-is-fine:

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Neue Nationalgalerie and a large Calder stabile, the Matthaikirche in the background, 1960s

(Source: domusweb.it, via thomortiz)

mehtapty:

The Maison de Verre (French for House of Glass) was built from 1928 to 1932 in Paris, France. Constructed in the early modern style of architecture, the house’s design emphasized three primary traits: honesty of materials, variable transparency of forms, and juxtaposition of “industrial” materials and fixtures with a more traditional style of home décor. The primary materials used were steel, glass, and glass block. Some of the notable “industrial” elements included rubberized floor tiles, bare steel beams, perforated metal sheet, heavy industrial light fixtures, and mechanical fixtures.

The design was a collaboration among Pierre Chareau (a furniture and interiors designer), Bernard Bijvoet (a Dutch architect working in Paris since 1927) and Louis Dalbet (craftsman metalworker).

1-Elevation

2-Ground Floor Plan

3-First Floor Plan

4-Second Floor Plan

5- Under construction

1-5 via   6- via   7- via

(via thomortiz)

aadnesen:

Can Lis, Mallorca, by Jorn Utzon.

(via arquitecturascorrientes)

finn-wilkie:

John Pawson, St. Moritz Church Renovation, Augsburg, 2013

www.johnpawson.com/

(Source: erasmiakad, via grmhrtdesigns)

(Source: metallick, via mnql)

loverofbeauty:

Frederic Edwin Church - Seascape with Icecap in the Distance (detail).

loverofbeauty:

Frederic Edwin Church - Seascape with Icecap in the Distance (detail).

(Source: marieantoinete, via thomortiz)

ana-ventura:

:-) on Flickr.

ana-ventura:

:-) on Flickr.

touof:

Adrian Paci - The Column, 2013

finnishthings:

pirkka chairs,1955, designed by ilmari tapiovaara

finnishthings:

pirkka chairs,1955, designed by ilmari tapiovaara

spaceofstone:

Ilmari Tapiovaara, chair, Lacquered wood, 65 x 68 x 72 cm, 1961, Finland

spaceofstone:

Ilmari Tapiovaara, chair, Lacquered wood, 65 x 68 x 72 cm, 1961, Finland

satinjapan:

50 x 44 inches

satinjapan:

50 x 44 inches

(via jesuisperdu)

archatlas:

Arquitecturas/Estancias Bleda y Rosa

"While we were working on their series Cities, we started to photograph spaces related to the urban. This was the start of our special attention to and interest in symbolic and monumental spaces—palaces, noble villas, majestic cities—that manifest a dual nature: they were centres of power and decision-making, but also lived spaces, places of privacy for a variety of personages. This condition also speaks of a dual temporality: that which corresponds to the time of the historic event and that which belongs to personal biographical time. This particular tension in the nature of the spaces in Rooms is caught and accentuated through the fragmentation of architecture, with columns, floors or corners calling up a palpable and intimate space and resisting monumentalization. Our images do not describe these rooms or place us in them, but cause us to experience them and return to them through evocation."

(via arquitecturascorrientes)

elunami:

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe contribution ‘Wabe’ (honeycomb) to the idea competition for the skycraper at the Bahnhof Friedrichstrasse, 1922
Large photograph, supplemented by drawing (140x100 cm)
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2009

elunami:

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe contribution ‘Wabe’ (honeycomb) to the idea competition for the skycraper at the Bahnhof Friedrichstrasse, 1922

Large photograph, supplemented by drawing (140x100 cm)

© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2009

(via grmhrtdesigns)

design-is-fine:

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Neue Nationalgalerie and a large Calder stabile, the Matthaikirche in the background, 1960s

design-is-fine:

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Neue Nationalgalerie and a large Calder stabile, the Matthaikirche in the background, 1960s

(Source: domusweb.it, via thomortiz)

About:

ensaios paralelos

(monica_lisbon)

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